"You kiss me with your mouth wide open like you’re not afraid of swallowing poison. I taste the good and bad in you and want them both. We call this bravery."

Anita Ofokansi, Literary Sexts  (via unbloom)

(Source: larmoyante, via l-unasoul)

@3 hours ago with 35454 notes
)
ragemovement:

wristxrocket:

dear-drifter:

lilightfoot:

Remember.

his life was totally in danger.

^^^^

Wow look at all them “good” cops watching and defending him

ragemovement:

wristxrocket:

dear-drifter:

lilightfoot:

Remember.

his life was totally in danger.

^^^^

Wow look at all them “good” cops watching and defending him

(Source: kropotkindersurprise, via wreckfest)

@3 hours ago with 7212 notes
)
aquapainter:

Oh my god

aquapainter:

Oh my god

(via psycho-delic-cunt)

@3 hours ago with 84337 notes
)
@3 hours ago with 212 notes
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bitterarab:

Neocolonialism: completely destroying a country up until the point where the only form of salvation that they have, is asking the perpetrator of that destruction for help, and only offering that help when trade is completely in the imperialists favour.

"Yes, we’ll help rebuild your country after destroying. But first, we accept payments in the form of any natural resources such as oil, copper, aluminium, gold, etc."

(via bitterarab)

@3 hours ago with 357 notes
)
dinolich:

srsfunny:

Black Leopard’s Reaction When He Sees His Favorite Zoo Keeper

what a baby

dinolich:

srsfunny:

Black Leopard’s Reaction When He Sees His Favorite Zoo Keeper

what a baby

(via alxndrasplace)

@3 hours ago with 411987 notes
)
ultrafacts:

Source
Follow Ultrafacts for more facts!

ultrafacts:

Source

Follow Ultrafacts for more facts!

(via alxndrasplace)

@9 hours ago with 4628 notes
)

the-girl-with-the-music:

sorayachemaly:

NOT A JOKE: Photos from Personhood for Women

Also, check out National Advocates for Pregnant Women, org that stands up for the rights of women (often the ones with the least means) who have no way of  debunks bad science and challenges religious lunatics in courts. 

I really, really need this to be fake or satirical for the love of everything please

(via namekscum)

@10 hours ago with 66783 notes
)

Sri Yantra~ the universe in a geometric pattern, five female triangles, four male, and the center, the start of all energy

Sri Yantra~ the universe in a geometric pattern, five female triangles, four male, and the center, the start of all energy

(Source: thetawavess, via pennyroyal-tree)

@3 hours ago with 1399 notes
)

5000letters:

but it really is so important to find people who don’t lose patience with you or get angry if you’re being irrational or insecure or downright ridiculous, it is so so necessary to be treated with gentleness from loved ones and not to be made to feel like you’re irritating or a burden

(via cosmiccora)

@3 hours ago with 5639 notes
)

sschol:

this is from spy kids

(Source: nasturbate, via nymph-lode)

@3 hours ago with 708342 notes
)
electripipedream:

Kiyoshi Awazu1975

electripipedream:

Kiyoshi Awazu
1975

(via universeobserver)

@3 hours ago with 1131 notes
)

phiphiohara:

themelmoshow:

lacigreen:

dama3:

baelor:

Trans Woman Dares Bible-Quoting Councilman to Stone Her to Death

that’s fucking hardcore

!!!!

This will never be overshared

Amazing!

(via luminouslyssa)

@3 hours ago with 317941 notes
)
neurosciencestuff:

Important advance in brain mapping and memory
“When a tiger starts to move towards you, you need to know whether it is something you are actually seeing or whether it’s just something that you remember or have imagined,” says Prof. Julio Martinez-Trujillo of McGill’s Department of Physiology. The researcher and his team have discovered that there is a clear frontier in the brain between the area that encodes information about what is immediately before the eyes and the area that encodes the abstract representations that are the product of our short-term memory or imagination. It is an important advance in brain mapping and opens the doors to further research in the area of short-term memory.
These finding, which are described in an article just published in Nature Neuroscience, resolve a question that has occupied neuroscientists for years. Namely that of how and where exactly in the brain the visual information coming from our eyes is first transformed into short-term memories. “We found that while one area in the brain processes information about what we are currently seeing, an area right beside it stores the information in short-term memory,” says McGill PhD student Diego Mendoza-Halliday, first author of the article.  “What is so exciting about this finding is that until now, no one knew the place where visual information first gets transformed into short-term memory.”
The researchers arrived at this conclusion by measuring the neuronal activity in these two areas in the brains of macaques as they first looked at, and then after a short time (1.2 - 2 seconds) remembered, a random sequence of dots moving across a computer screen like rainfall. What surprised Martinez-Trujillo and his team was how clearly demarcated the divide was between the activities and functions of the two brain areas, and this despite the fact that they lie side-by-side.
“It is rare to find this kind of sharp boundary in biological systems of any kind,” says Martinez-Trujillo. “Most of the time, when you look at the function of different brain areas, there is more of a transitional zone, more grey and not such a clear border between black and white. I think the evolutionary reason for this clear frontier is that it helped us to survive in dangerous situations.”
The discovery comes after five years spent by Martinez-Trujillo and his team doing research in the area. Despite this fact, he acknowledges that there was a certain amount of serendipity, and a lot of technological help involved in being able to capture a signal that travels for 3 milliseconds and fires synapses in neurons that lie right beside one another.
Martinez-Trujillo and his team continue to work on mapping the receptors and connectivity between these two areas of the brain. But what is most important for him is to try and relate this discovery to schizophrenia and other diseases that involve hallucinations, and in order to do so he is working with a psychiatrist at Montreal’s Douglas Hospital.
(Image: Bigstock)

neurosciencestuff:

Important advance in brain mapping and memory

“When a tiger starts to move towards you, you need to know whether it is something you are actually seeing or whether it’s just something that you remember or have imagined,” says Prof. Julio Martinez-Trujillo of McGill’s Department of Physiology. The researcher and his team have discovered that there is a clear frontier in the brain between the area that encodes information about what is immediately before the eyes and the area that encodes the abstract representations that are the product of our short-term memory or imagination. It is an important advance in brain mapping and opens the doors to further research in the area of short-term memory.

These finding, which are described in an article just published in Nature Neuroscience, resolve a question that has occupied neuroscientists for years. Namely that of how and where exactly in the brain the visual information coming from our eyes is first transformed into short-term memories. “We found that while one area in the brain processes information about what we are currently seeing, an area right beside it stores the information in short-term memory,” says McGill PhD student Diego Mendoza-Halliday, first author of the article.  “What is so exciting about this finding is that until now, no one knew the place where visual information first gets transformed into short-term memory.”

The researchers arrived at this conclusion by measuring the neuronal activity in these two areas in the brains of macaques as they first looked at, and then after a short time (1.2 - 2 seconds) remembered, a random sequence of dots moving across a computer screen like rainfall. What surprised Martinez-Trujillo and his team was how clearly demarcated the divide was between the activities and functions of the two brain areas, and this despite the fact that they lie side-by-side.

“It is rare to find this kind of sharp boundary in biological systems of any kind,” says Martinez-Trujillo. “Most of the time, when you look at the function of different brain areas, there is more of a transitional zone, more grey and not such a clear border between black and white. I think the evolutionary reason for this clear frontier is that it helped us to survive in dangerous situations.”

The discovery comes after five years spent by Martinez-Trujillo and his team doing research in the area. Despite this fact, he acknowledges that there was a certain amount of serendipity, and a lot of technological help involved in being able to capture a signal that travels for 3 milliseconds and fires synapses in neurons that lie right beside one another.

Martinez-Trujillo and his team continue to work on mapping the receptors and connectivity between these two areas of the brain. But what is most important for him is to try and relate this discovery to schizophrenia and other diseases that involve hallucinations, and in order to do so he is working with a psychiatrist at Montreal’s Douglas Hospital.

(Image: Bigstock)

(via alxndrasplace)

@8 hours ago with 456 notes
)

mypubliclands:

Nine BLM Wilderness Areas Make Wilderness Society’s “15 of America’s Most Photogenic Wilderness Areas”

This year, the Bureau of Land Management and other land management agencies, non-government partners and the American public celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act.  For this anniversary, the Wilderness Society has been featuring beautiful wilderness areas across the United States.  Their latest feature, “15 of America’s Most Photogenic Wilderness Areas,” include nine BLM-managed wilderness areas, all a part of the BLM’s beautiful National Conservation Lands

(via alxndrasplace)

@10 hours ago with 464 notes
)